Gender Equality in Trinidad and Tobago

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Trinidad_and_Tobago
flag_Trinidad_and_Tobago.png
Flag of Trinidad_and_Tobago
Population (in Mil.) 1.34
Gross Domestic Product (In USD Billions - WB) 23.32
Sex Ratio (m/f) 1.03
Life Expectancy Ratio (f/m) 1.106060606
Fertility Rate 1.72
Estimated Earned Income (f/m) 0.56
Tertiary Enrolment Ratio (f/m) 11.5
Women in Parliament (in %) 28.6
INDICES
Human Development Index 67/187
Social Institutions and Gender Index 7/86
Gender Inequality Index 67/186
Gender Equity Index 16/168
Women’s Economic Opportunity Index - /128
Global Gender Gap Index 36/68
More information on variables

Contents

Social Institutions

Independent from Britain since 1962, the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago is one of the wealthiest countries in the Caribbean, due to oil and natural gas reserves.[1] The two islands that make up the state are ethnically and religiously diverse, including Catholics (26%) and Protestant Christian denominations (31.6%), Hindus (22.5 %), and Muslims (5.8%) (figures for 2000).[2] About 46% of the population is of African origin, and another 38.5% is traces their heritage to the Indian subcontinent.[3] Although politically stable, Trinidad and Tobago has seen rising levels of crime in the past two decades, as a result of its location as a major trans-shipment point for cocaine.[4] Trinidad and Tobago is classed as a high-income country by the World Bank.[5]

Women in the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago generally share the same legal rights as men concerning employment, education, inheritance, and equal pay.[6] The Constitution prohibits all forms of discrimination on the grounds of gender.[7] This ruling concerns the State alone, however, and does not cover non-state or private parties. The article in the Constitution does not apply when it conflicts with existing laws.[8] Violence against women is a serious problem and is linked to strong patriarchal traditions and male dominance in daily life.[9] In addition, there is a significant gender pay gap, particularly in the private sector.[10]

Trinidad and Tobago ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Violence Against Women in 1990, but has not yet ratified the Optional Protocol.[11] The country ratified the Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women (‘Convention of Belém do Pará’) in 1996.[12] Trinidad and Tobago is ranked in 62nd place in the 2011 Human Development Index (out of 187 countries), with a score of 0.760.[13] The country’s score in the Gender Inequality Index is 0.331 (53rd out of 146 countries).[14] Trinidad and Tobago is ranked in 21st place in the 2011 Global Gender Gap Index (out of 135 countries), with a score of 0.7372.[15]

Discriminatory Family Code

In Trinidad and Tobago, marriages can be performed (and are legally recognised) under civil law or under religious law[16]. The minimum legal age for marriage depends on the type of union involved. The civil Marriage Act stipulates that men and women must be 18 years old to marry. By contrast, Islamic Sharia law sets the minimum age for marriage at 12 years for women and 16 years for men, while Hindu law fixes the minimum age at 14 years for women and 18 years for men. In the Orisa community, the minimum is 16 years for women and 18 years for men.[17] National law states that minors cannot marry without the consent of their parents, and must always have reached the minimum age set by their community. However, Hindu women under 18 but who are older than 16 can marry without their parents’ consent.[18] According to the 2008 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, just 1.6% of women married women aged 15-49 were married before there 15th birthday. For women aged 20-49, 10.7% were married before they turned 18.[19] In 2006, 6.3% of girls between 15 and 19 years of age were married or in union.[20]

Polygamy is not recognised under any of the marriage systems in Trinidad and Tobago.[21] By law, when a couple wish to marry, both parties must make a declaration that there is no legal hindrance to the marriage.[22] Bigamy is punishable by up to four years in prison.[23] According to the 2001 report to the CEDAW committee, de facto polygamous unions do exist in Trinidad and Tobago, but these have no legal recognition.[24] In Trinidad and Tobago, mothers and fathers have equal rights regarding parental authority (with both considered to be the ‘natural guardians of the child’) and child custody, with the courts deciding child custody arrangements in the best interests of the child.[25] Women and men appear to have the same rights to divorce, with the CEDAW report stating that repudiation (i.e. unilateral divorce on the part of the husband) is not practised.[26] Unless the paternity is registered, the mother has the sole responsibility for children born out of wedlock.[27] Women have the right to pass citizenship onto their children.[28] The 1981 law on inheritance does not discriminate on the grounds of gender.[29] It is unclear whether women face de facto discrimination in regard to inheritance practices in Trinidad and Tobago.

Restricted Physical Integrity

Rape, including spousal rape, is a criminal offence and is punishable by up to life imprisonment.[30] According to the US Department of State human rights report for 2010), the court system often hands out much lighter sentences.[31] The 1999 law on domestic violence has broadened the definition of violence against women to include emotional, psychological and economic violence.[32] Under the Domestic Violence Act, protection orders can be enforced, prohibiting the perpetrator from making any contact with the victim and / or forcing the perpetrator to pay monetary compensation; if these are breached, perpetrators can be fined or imprisoned for up to 5 years.[33] According to the NGO Coalition Against Domestic Violence, police do not effectively enforce the law.[34] There is no law specifically banning sexual harassment.[35] The Crime and Problem Analysis Branch of the police service recorded 260 cases of rape from January to 7 December 2010; according to the US Department of State, both local NGOs and the government believe actual levels of rape and other sexual assaults are much higher, but that perceived insensitivity on the part of the police inhibits reporting.[36] While reliable national statistics on domestic violence incidents are not available, local women’s rights groups estimate that 20-25% of all women in Trinidad and Tobago suffered domestic abuse.[37] Publicly, over 80% of respondents to a 2006 World Values Survey declared that it was never justifiable for a man to hit his wife.[38] The 2008 Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) offered respondents one of five reasons why a man might be justified in hitting his wife; just 7.6% agreed with at least one reason.[39] There is no evidence to suggest that female genital mutilation is practised in Trinidad and Tobago.[40] Abortion is legal in cases where they woman’s mental or physical health is in danger.[41] Women have the right to access contraception and information about family planning and reproductive health in Trinidad and Tobago.[42] Compared to other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, the contraceptive prevalence rate in Trinidad and Tobago is low: 42.5% of women aged 15-49 currently married or in union interviewed for the 2008 MICS reported using contraceptives regularly as a means to prevent conception. Unlike other Latin American nations, condoms were the most preferred method, as reported by 13% of survey takers. Also in contrast to many other Latin American nations, the percent of women who had undergone sterilization is low at 8.4%. Correspondingly, 26.7% of survey respondents reported an unmet need for family planning services.[43]

Son Bias

According to data from the 2008 MICS, 66.8% of boys and 64.8% of girls aged under two and a half had received all their basic vaccinations.[44] Under-five mortality rates were slightly higher for girls (37 per 1000 live births) than for boys (32 per 1000 live births).[45] Gender-disaggregated data on malnutrition was not available. Given that in most contexts, rates of under-five mortality are higher for boys than for girls (due to physiological differences between female and male children), this could indicate son preference in regard to early childhood care. The 2008 MICS found that only 0.7% of children were involved in child labour (defined as at least one hour of economic work or 28 hours of domestic labour per week, for children aged 5-11); as such, the sample was too small to assess.[46] According to UNICEF and drawing on data from 2005-2009, at primary school level, enrolment and attendance rates are virtually the same for girls and boys.[47] At secondary level, net enrolment rates are 76% for girls and 71% for boys; of those enrolled, 90% of girls attend, compared to 84% of boys, and enrolment rates are similarly higher for girls.[48] This would not indicate son preference in regard to access to education. The male/female sex ratio for the total population in 2012 is 1.03.[49]

There is no evidence to suggest that Trinidad and Tobago is a country of concern in relation to missing women.

Restricted Resources and Entitlements

The government of Trinidad and Tobago affirms women’s rights to property ownership, and there are no legal restrictions on their access to land. In 1982, the most recent year for which information is available, women represented one-fifth of all landowners.[50] Subsequent to the 1972 Law on Matrimonial Proceedings and Property, married women have the same rights as their husbands in regard to access to property other than land. The 1999 Married Persons Act enables wives to sign contracts in their name, without their husbands’ authorisation, and protects their capacity to administer their own property. Contracts that restrict the legal capacity of women contradict this law and are declared null and void.[51] Women’s rights to obtain access to bank loans are recognised in Trinidad and Tobago, but no information is available to indicate the proportion of women who have successfully borrowed from private banks. Women are often at a disadvantage because they cannot provide the necessary guarantees, and may turn to outfits that provide small-business loans and microfinance programmes.[52]

Restricted Civil Liberties

The Constitution upholds the rights of women to freedom of movement, and there are no reported de facto restrictions on these rights. Freedom of speech, association and assembly are respected in Trinidad and Tobago. Freedom House reports that there is a robust civil society, and this appears to include groups active on women’s rights issues.[53] Women and men have the same right to vote and to stand for election in Trinidad and Tobago.[54] As of November 2009 there were 11 women serving of out 41 elected seats in the House of Representatives, and 13 women out of 31 seats in the Senate, which is appointed.[55] In addition, there are 11 women serving in the 28-member cabinet, as well as 12 out of 37 judges on the High Court and the Court of Appeals.[56] There is strong support for female political leadership within the country. Over 72 % of those polled in 2006 either disagreed or disagreed strongly with the statement, ‘Men make better political leaders than women do.’[57] All employed women in Trinidad and Tobago receive 13 weeks of paid maternity leave. They receive full pay for a month, followed by two months of half pay, covered by their employer, plus a sum depending on their earnings, which is paid by the national social security system. Information on other legal protections is not available.[58]

References

  1. BBC (n.d.) ‘Trinidad and Tobago country profile’, BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/country_profiles/1209827.stm (accessed 25 November 2011); CIA (2011); Freedom House (2010) ‘Freedom in the World country reports: Trinidad and Tobago’, http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=363&year=2010&country=7935, accessed 25 November 2011)
  2. Central Statistical Office (CSO), (2000), CSO (n.d.), Table 10: Summary Characteristics of Households in Sample by Ethnic Group of Head of Household
  3. Central Statistical Office (CSO), (2000); CSO (n.d.), Table 10: Summary Characteristics of Households in Sample by Ethnic Group of Head of Household
  4. BBC (n.d.) ‘Trinidad and Tobago country profile’, BBC News, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/country_profiles/1209827.stm (accessed 25 November 2011)
  5. World Bank (n.d.) ‘Data: Trinidad and Tobago’, Washington, D.C.: World Bank, http://data.worldbank.org/country/trinidad-and-tobago (accessed 24 November 2011)
  6. US Department of State (2010), 2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Trinidad and Tobago, US Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, Washington, DC, http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2010/wha/154521.htm (accessed 25 November 2011)
  7. Article 4 of the Constitution of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, 1976/2000 in Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.30.
  8. Article 13 of the Constitution in Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 30.
  9. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 43.
  10. US State Department (2011) 2010 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Uruguay, http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/35638.htm
  11. United Nations Treaty Collection (UNTC) (2010): Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Discrimination Against Women, countries ratified. - CEDAW: http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-8&chapter=4&lang=en (accessed 22 November 2011) - Optional Protocol: http://treaties.un.org/Pages/ViewDetails.aspx?src=TREATY&mtdsg_no=IV-8-b&chapter=4&lang=en (accessed 22 November)
  12. Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) (n.d.) Inter-American Convention on the Prevention, Punishment and Eradication of Violence Against Women (‘Convention of Belém do Pará’) – status of ratification, http://www.cidh.oas.org/Basicos/English/Basic14.Conv%20of%20Belem%20Do%20Para%20Ratif.htm (accessed 23 November 2011)
  13. United Nations Development Programme (2011) Human Development Report 2011, available at http://hdr.undp.org/en/media/HDR_2011_EN_Complete.pdf, accessed 29 February 2012. p.128
  14. Reference 13
  15. World Economic Forum (2011) The Global Gender Gap Report 2011, available at http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_GenderGap_Report_2011.pdf, accessed 2 March 2012 p.10
  16. Marriage Act Chapter 45.01, Muslim Marriage and Divorce Act Chap. 45.02, Hindu Marriage Act Chap.45.03, Orisa Marriage Act No. 22 of 1999 in Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.134
  17. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.135
  18. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 134-135.
  19. Ministry of Social Development (MSD), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and the Central Statistical Office, The Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (CSO) (2008), Multiple Indicator No. 67.
  20. Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (2006) p.172
  21. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.135
  22. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.135
  23. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 135.
  24. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.135
  25. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.139
  26. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY p.135
  27. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.139
  28. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.70
  29. Succession Act, No.27 of 1981 in Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, pp.136-138
  30. Reference 10
  31. Reference 10
  32. Domestic Violence Act, No. 27 of 1999 in Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.141.
  33. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.141-142
  34. Reference 10
  35. Reference 10
  36. Reference 10
  37. Reference 10
  38. World Values Survey (WVS) (2006), Selected Country/Sample: Trinidad and Tobago, WVS: available http://worldvaluessurvey.org, accessed 25 February 2010, Question V208.
  39. Ministry of Social Development (MSD), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and the Central Statistical Office (CSO), [Trinidad and Tobago]) (2008), Trinidad and Tobago Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 3 Final Report 2008, MSD, UNICEF, CSO: Port-of-Spain, Trinidad Table CP.5.
  40. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.43
  41. United Nations (2011) ‘World Abortion Policies 2011’, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division, New York. http://www.un.org/esa/population/publications/2011abortion/2011wallchart.pdf
  42. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.141
  43. See reference 39, Tables RH.1 and RH.2
  44. See reference 39, Table CH.2
  45. See reference 39, Table CM.1
  46. See reference 39, p.53
  47. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (n.d.) ‘Trinidad and Tobago – statistics’, http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/trinidad_tobago_statistics.html (accessed 24 November 2011)
  48. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) (n.d.) ‘Trinidad and Tobago – statistics’, http://www.unicef.org/infobycountry/trinidad_tobago_statistics.html (accessed 24 November 2011)
  49. Central Intelligence Agency (2012) The World Fact Book: Sex Ratio, available at https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2018.html, accessed 29 February 2012.
  50. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 126.
  51. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 31.
  52. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 124-126.
  53. Freedom House (2010) ‘Freedom in the World country reports: Trinidad and Tobago’, http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=363&year=2010&country=7935, accessed 25 November 2011); Reference 10
  54. Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p.65
  55. Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) (2010), Women in Parliament: All Countries on National Parliaments, IPU: Geneva, http://www.ipu.org/wmn-e/classif.htm.
  56. US Department of State (2010), 2009 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices: Trinidad and Tobago, US Department of State, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, Washington, DC.
  57. World Values Survey (WVS) (2006), Selected Country/Sample: Trinidad and Tobago, WVS: available http://worldvaluessurvey.org, accessed 25 February 2010, Question V61.
  58. International Labour Organization (ILO) (2009), Database of Conditions and Work Employment Laws, ILO: Geneva, Switzerland, accessed 25 February 2010; Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) (2001), Consideration of Reports Submitted by States Parties Under Article 18 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women: Trinidad and Tobago, Combined Initial, Second and Third Periodic Reports of States Parties, CEDAW/C/TTO/1-3, CEDAW, New York, NY, p. 42.

The FAO Gender and Land Rights Database

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The FAO Gender and Land Rights Database contains country level information on social, economic, political and cultural issues related to the gender inequalities embedded in those rights. Disparity on land access is one of the major causes for social and gender inequalities in rural areas, and it jeopardizes, as a consequence, rural food security as well as the wellbeing of individuals and families.

Six categories

The Database offers information on the 6 following Categories:

For detailed information on Trinidad and Tobago, please visit the report on Trinidad and Tobago in the FAO Gender and Land Rights Database.

Sources

[[Category:Trinidad_and_Tobago]

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